Book of the Month
December 2018

The Glass Universe
by
Dava Sobel

Early in the 20th century an ambitious project commenced at the Harvard College Observatory – the study of thousands of glass photographic plates containing telescopic image of the stars, each plate holding secrets just waiting to be discovered. An industrious group of individuals took up the challenge – and they were all women. Dava Sobel, author of Galileo’s Daughter, a book we also have at the Lamplighter Library, describes the valuable contributions to astronomy made by this tenacious team, during a time when women were not yet allowed to vote. There is a Canadian connection here: one of the biographies is of Helen Sawyer. In the 1920s, she became a renowned expert on globular star clusters. Later, she and her husband Frank Hogg moved to Canada to become two of this country’s foremost astronomers. The Glass Universe will be available at the RASC meeting this month!

Mark Zalcik
Librarian

Book of the Month
November 2018

Binocular Highlights
by
Gary Seronik

A look through binoculars at the night sky can reveal so much more detail than looking with the naked eye, as Gary Seronik points out in his book Binocular Highlights, published by Sky Publishing. Seronik zeroes in on 99 objects, including galaxies, star clusters, and double and variable stars. Handy sky maps help the reader to locate the objects. And a darkened circle on each object map tells you what you will see with standard 10×50 binoculars. So pack your binnies in your travels and pick up this book at the Lamplighter Library!

Mark Zalcik
Librarian

Book of the Month
September 2018

365 Starry Nights
by
Chet Raymo

At any particular time of the year there are particular constellations that are prominent in the night sky. For example, now in September, Cygnus the Swan sits high in the evening sky. 365 Starry Nights by Chet Raymo takes the reader on an introductory course on astronomy, one night at a time. Each night of the year is represented by an illustrated panel showing an aspect of one of the constellations of the season. The topic may be one of its interesting stars, a prominent deep sky object such as a star cluster, or ancient lore about the animal or person depicted by the constellation. Look for 365 Starry Nights in the collection of Lamplighter Library books set up at the library table prior to this month’s RASC meeting.
Mark Zalcik
Librarian

Book of the Month
June 2018

Observing Noctilucent Clouds
by
Michael Gadsden and Pekka Parviainen

The June Book of the Month is Observing Noctilucent Clouds by Michael Gadsden and Pekka Parviainen.  The book was the featured book a year ago, but as it’s such a good introductory book on noctilucent clouds (NLC), and as it is available online, well, here it is again. You can find it at:

http://www.iaga-aiga.org/data/uploads/pdf/guides/onc.pdf

Observing Noctilucent Clouds contains a great set of photo showing the various structures of NLC and their corresponding notations. At the end of the book are instructions on how to calculate the angle of the Sun below the horizon, which determines how high NLC will be in your sky. Have look, and then stay up a bit late over the next couple of months – it’s NLC season now!

The Lamplighter Library will not be accessible during the renovation of our usual meeting venue, the star theatre, but in the meantime a selection of books will be available outside the IMAX theatre before and after each meeting!

Mark Zalcik
Librarian

Book of the Month
April 2018

The Zoomable Universe
by
Caleb Scharf

If we take the standard measurement of one meter and look at real-world examples of what’s a meter long, we can think of many such candidates. A meter is a pretty convenient benchmark for us 1-2m tall humans. Now, if we start going in either direction by a power of 10, zooming progressively larger and smaller by exponents of one, we delve into some fascinating territory. A few exponents in the positive direction and we reach distances with which we amateur astronomers are familiar – the millions and billions of kilometers spanning the solar system, the galaxy, the universe. A few exponents in the negative direction and we enter the unseen realms of bacteria, wavelengths of light, and the components of atoms. Wonderfully illustrated, this 2017 book is a concise overview of the extremely large and small. For those who would like a distance-scale refresher course on the awe-inspiring, the mind-boggling, and the sometimes just plain-gross, please do keep in mind that this volume is now available at the Lamplighter Library.

The Lamplighter Library will not be accessible during the renovation of our usual meeting venue, the star theatre, but in the meantime a selection of books will be available outside the IMAX theatre before and after each meeting!

Mark Zalcik
Librarian

Book of the Month
March 2018

Annals of the Deep Sky Vol 5.
Centaurus, Cepheus, and Cetus
by

Jeff Kanipe & Dennis Webb


The fifth volume of the Annals of the Deep Sky Series by Kanipe and Webb has recently come out. And we have it here at the Lamplighter Library! Featured constellations in Volume 5 are Centaurus, Cepheus, and Cetus. Deep sky objects are the main focus of the book, but there are also in-depth descriptions of other interesting celestial objects within the highlighted constellations, as well as numerous maps and charts. For example, the diagram shown beside the book cover shows a figure from the Centaurus section indicating what parts of the Earth can see the constellation entirely or partially. Stop by at the library table to have a look at this book and many others that will be out on display.

The Lamplighter Library will not be accessible during the renovation of our usual meeting venue, the star theatre, but in the meantime a selection of books will be available outside the IMAX theatre before and after each meeting!

Mark Zalcik
Librarian

Book of the Month
February 2018

 Star Names – Their Lore and Meaning
by

Richard Hinckley Allen


As we learn to navigate our way among the night sky’s constellations, we gradually learn more names of the most prominent and peculiar stars. But do we know the origins of all these names? Star Names – Their Lore and Meaning by Richard Hinckly Allen, the book now over half a century old, remains a reliable guide to the etymology of the stars and constellations. In the main section of the book, the author leads us alphabetically through the constellations, pointing out the history of the constellation name and those of the main stars. The Greek name origins figure prominently, but Arabic meanings as well as Chinese are mentioned. The comprehensive listing includes star groups long forgotten. For example, Custos Messium, the Harvest-Keeper, is a smattering of stars close to the North Celestial Pole; the constellation honors the French Astronomer Charles Messier, who in his time “harvested” several comets in the late 1700s. Marvel at the many strangely-named objects mentioned in the book. The 4th magnitude star Epsilon Delphini in China was known as Pae Chaou, the Rotten Melon. Or an alternate name for the Dumbbell Nebula in Vulpecula – the Double-headed Shot. The book will be available at the Lamplighter Library table before and after the RASC meeting.

The Lamplighter Library will not be accessible during the renovation of our usual meeting venue, the star theatre, but in the meantime a selection of books will be available outside the IMAX theatre before and after each meeting!

Mark Zalcik
Librarian

Book of the Month
January 2018

On Tycho’s Island
by

John Robert Christianson


Tycho Brahe, the Danish nobleman and astronomer of the latter half of the 1500s, has been described as “the first competent mind in modern astronomy to feel ardently the passion for exact empirical facts”. The consummate observer, his observations were some five times more accurate than the best available observations at the time. This book explores his wide range of activities, based at his estate on the island of Hven, his research institute being Uraniborg. Tycho mastered at incorporating others into his program of cosmic reform, most notably Johannes Kepler. The book includes capsule biographies of Kepler and numerous other individuals who collaborated with Brahe up to the time of his death in 1601.

The Lamplighter Library will not be accessible during the renovation of our usual meeting venue, the star theatre, but in the meantime a selection of books will be available outside the IMAX theatre before and after each meeting!

Check out this book and hundreds of other books, at The Lamplighter Memorial Library, just off the entrance to the star theater.

Mark Zalcik
Librarian