International Observe the Moon Night
Sep 18 & 25, 2010

International Observe the Moon Night

Observatory at TELUS World of Science
11211 – 142 St., Edmonton AB

Sep 18 & 25, 2010

20100918_lnOMNLogoThe Edmonton Centre hosted International Observe the Moon Night on September 18 by opening the Edmonton Centre Observatory to the public for viewing the Moon and other celestial delights. The event was to feature a contest for young astronomers (aged 10-17) to win a free telescope donated by the Centre. The sky conditions were, uh, variable, but we did get decent views of the Moon at times, and later Jupiter and Uranus. We also got a few double stars but deep sky objects were a write-off. We were extremely busy throughout the evening, with about 100 visitors over the four hours. The level of interest and appreciation of the public was particularly high.

Telescope Contest

Young astronomers (10-17 years) were invited to enter a contest to win a FREE telescope donated by the RASC Edmonton Centre. Unfortunately due to the rather poor skies, we were forced to postpone the telescope contest to September 25. This turned out to be a good decision, since September 25 was one of those beautiful, warm autumn days with great skies for a public astronomy event. The evening was basically shirt-sleeve conditions which brought back an even larger crowd to the Observatory. Thirteen young astronomers entered a draw to win a free telescope by making 5 simple observations: point out 2 constellations, observe the Moon and draw what they saw, observe Jupiter and draw what they saw, observe a double star and describe what they saw, and observe a deep-sky object and describe what they saw. Several budding astronomers and potential future members of the RASC had a lot of fun operating small telescopes and learning about the night sky.

Thanks to the generosity of RASC Edmonton Centre members and donors, there turned out to be 3 telescopes to awarded as prizes. At the October 18 RASC meeting, draws were made among the 13 contestants for a 90mm Celestron refractor, a 4.5″ reflector, and a Celestron IYA scope.

My thanks to Kathryn Vanzella, Massimo Torri, Bruce McCurdy and others who helped make this event a success. And thanks to Glen Bertrand and two anonymous donors for the telescopes!


2010 International Observe the Moon Night
and
*** CONTEST TO WIN A FREE TELESCOPE !***

Saturday, September 25, 2010

20111008_inomn_footerYoung astronomers were invited enter a contest to win a FREE telescopes donated by the RASC Edmonton Centre as described below. The contest was held on the lawn in front of the Observatory at TELUS World of Science, on Saturday, September 25, 2010.

Telescope Contest Details

Subject to number of entrants, the RASC has up to 3 starter telescopes to donate to worthy young astronomers (90mm Celestron refractor, 4.5″ reflector, Celestron IYA scope). Young astronomers (10-17 years) are invited to observe 5 objects in the night sky, listed below, while visiting the Observatory and by doing so enter a draw for a telescope. The actual draw will be made at the October 18 RASC Meeting.

Assistance, telescopes and sky charts with all of the objects labeled will be available.

  1. Find the constellations of Cassiopeia & Ursa Major (which includes the Big Dipper). Point them out to an Observatory volunteer.
  2. Observe the Moon with a telescope. Make a drawing of what you see.
  3. Use a telescope to manually find and observe one of the planets Jupiter, Uranus or Neptune. Make a drawing of what you see.
  4. Use a telescope to manually find and observe one or more of the following double stars. Describe what you see.
    – Mizar (zeta Ursa Majoris)
    – Albireo (beta Cygni)
    – Double Double (epsilon Lyrae)
    – Ras Algethi (alpha Herculis)
    – gamma Delphini
    – Almach (gamma Andromedae)
  5. Use a telescope to manually find and observe one or more of the following deep sky objects. Describe what you see.
    – M11 (Wild Duck Cluster in Scutum)
    – M13 (Great Globular Cluster in Hercules)
    – M15 (Globular Cluster in Pegasus)
    – M27 (Dumbbell Nebula in Vulpecula)
    – M31 (Andromeda Galaxy)
    – M57 (Ring Nebula in Lyra)
    – M92 (the other Globular Cluster in Hercules)

Enjoying Your Visit

Please dress for the weather and night time temperatures.

Children must be accompanied by an adult.